Shopping Cart
0 Items€0.00

ChessBase Magazine 163

Languages: German, English
Delivery: Download, Post
Level: Tournament player Professional
€19.95
€16.76 without VAT (for Customers outside the EU)
$18.10 (without VAT)

Highlights

Grand Prix Baku: Fabiano Caruana and Boris Gelfand in tandem, Evgeny Tomashevsky remains unbeaten, the Russian annotates his game against Radjabov; with a big opening special by Mihail Marin

Grand Prix Tashkent: The victors of Baku don't play a role, Dmitry Andreikin is the sole triumphator. He has analysed his fine achievement against Karjakin for ChessBase Magazine.

Grand Slam Final: Vishy Anand with a splendid start, he is first with one round to go. The Indian has annotated his white game against Vallejo.

European Cup Bilbao: The favourit team SOCAR remains invulnerable this time and wins all seven matches. With analysis by Adams, Harikrishna, Postny, Roiz, Sasikiran, Sutovsky.

Interactive training lectures: Dorian Rogozenco "Strategy", Oliver Reeh “Tactics" and Karsten Müller „Endgames“

13 new opening articles with ideas for your repertoire: from the Reti Opening to the King's Indian Defence!

Opening videos:
Williams: King's Gambit - 2.f4 exf4 3.Nf3 g5 4.Nc3
Marin: Queen's Gambit Cambridge Springs and the English Main Variation
Bojkov: King'sindian Defence - 5.f4 0-0 6.Nf3 e5!?

Introduction by Karsten Müller

Opening surveys


Illingworth: Reti Opening A11

1.c4 Nf6 2.g3 c6 3.Bg2 d5 4.Nf3 g6 5.b3 Bg7 6.Bb2 0-0 7.0-0

This flexible setup allows one to decide at a later point whether to follow it up with d3 or with d4. Max Illingworth has studded his article with numerous rules of thumb so that it is to a great extent possible to avoid having to learn long theoretical variations.

 

Kuzmin: Benkö Gambit A58

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.d5 b5 4.cxb5 a6 5.bxa6 g6 6.Nc3 Bg7 7.e4 0-0 8.Nf3 Qa5


As Alexey Kuzmin explains, what we have here is a totally new approach to playing the Volga. Black does not want to take on a6 quickly in order to prevent White from castling with Ba6xf1. Instead of that he is even prepared to rapidly exchange his queen.

 

Stohl: Benoni A60

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.g3 c5 4.d5 cxd5 5.exd5 b5


The Fianchetto Variation may not be reckoned the strongest way to fight the Modern Benoni, but nevertheless White does have chances of getting an advantage. So, with 5...b5!? Black is trying to go his own way at an early point; Igor Stohl investigates how dangerous that is for him.

 

Karolyi: Dutch Defence A83

1.d4 f5 2.e4 fxe4 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 Nc6 5.d5 Ne5 6.Qd4 Nf7 7.h4


Till now in this variation of the Staunton Gambit 7.Bxf6 was played – however it led to good results for Black. But as Tibor Karolyi demonstrates in his article, after 7.h4! Black has to face much greater problems. That represents a considerable upward revaluation of the move 2.e4.

 

Havasi: Modern Defence B06

1.e4 g6 2.d4 Bg7 3.Nc3 d6 4.f4 a6 5.Nf3 b5 6. Bd3 Bb7 7.Be3

At first White develops naturally with Bd3 and Be3. But as Gergö Havasi demonstrates in his analyses, you would require good knowledge of the theory specific to this variation in order to really get an advantage in the long run.

 

Krasenkow: Sicilian B22

1.e4 c5 2.c3 d5 3.exd5 Qxd5 4.d4 e6

At the level of club players, the Alapin Variation 2.c3 is very popular. So Michal Krasenkow makes you acquainted with his own repertoire against it. Early on 4...e6 is a subtle move, since White can hardly reply 5.dxc5 (5...Qxd1+).

 

Sumets: French C11

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.e5 Nfd7 5.f4 c6 6.Nf3 Nc6 7.Be3 Qb6 8.Na4 Qa5+ 9.c3 b6

After the strongest continuation 10.Bd2 c4 11.b4 there are two quite distinct lines: 11...Qa6 and 11...Nxb4. Andrey Sumets’ investigations prove that the knight sacrifice has a greater tendency to give Black satisfactory play.

 

Antic: French C12

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 Bb4 5.e5 h6 6.Bh4 g5 7.Bg3 Ne4 8.Nge2

6.Bh4 provokes 6...g5, and White hopes to be able to go on and exploit the weakness. Dejan Antic deals with 8...h5 and 8...f5, before turning to the main move 8...c5. It appears that White cannot lay claim to any objective advantage.

 

Müller: King's Gambit C37
1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Nf3 g5 4.
Nc3

From the position in the diagram Black has several moves: 4...g4?!, 4...Bg7, the subtle 4...d6 and 4...Nc6, which leads to a position which is frequently arrived at via a transposition of moves. Karsten Müller introduces you to the subtleties and goes far beyond present theory.

 

Gormally: Queen's Gambit Accepted D24

1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 a6 5.e4 b5 6.e5 Nd5 7.a4 e6 8.axb5

This is one of the sharpest variations of the Queen’s Gambit Accepted. By playing 7...e6 Black returns the pawn immediately. Daniel Gormally acquaints you with both continuations: 8...Bb4 and Miles’ 8...Nb6.

 

Postny: Grünfeld Defence D85

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.Bd2 Bg7 6.e4 Nxc3 7.Bxc3 0-0 8.Qd2

Nowadays 5.Bd2 is no longer a surprise way to meet the Grünfeld Defence. Evgeny Postny has worked intensively on the position in the diagram and come to the conclusion that there are several continuations for Black which give him a level game.

 

Marin: Nimzoindian E41

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e3 c5 5.Bd3 Nc6 6.Nf3 Bxc3+ 7.bxc3 d6 8.0-0 e5 9.d5 Ne7

The so-called Hübner Variation (Mihail Marin mentions earlier games by Portisch in the 1950s) is not an easy one to defuse. Our Romanian author tries to do so with 10.Nd2 and in his extensive article he is able to show a slight plus for White.

 

Szabo: King's Indian E98

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Nf3 0-0 6.Be2 e5 7.0-0 Nc6 8.d5 Ne7 9.Ne1 Ne8 10.Be3 f5 11.f3 f4 12.Bf2 h5 13.c5 g5

Krisztian Szabo is a specialist in this sharp variation, which can be characterised in brief as follows: White is better, but Black wins. So the risk factor is extremely high for both sides.

 

 

Reviews

Apart from the Baku and Tashkent Grand Prix events it also has commentary on games from the Bilbao Grand Prix and the European Union Cup 2014. The Bilbao Grand Prix, as is known, was won by Anand. The other tournament was more interesting. The European Cup was a tough competition with 52 teams participating. The Azeri team SOCAR scored an unbeaten first followed by Novy Bor.

Often ordered with...

ChessBase Magazine 164
ChessBase Magazine 164
WCh-match Sochi 2014 with a survey by Marin and video analyses by King. Hightlights from the London Chess Classic and Qatar Open with annotations by Yu Yangyi. Training on tactics, strategy and endgame. 12 opening articles with new repertroire ideas!
€19.95
ChessBase Magazine 165
ChessBase Magazine 165
Five top-class tournaments: Carlsen was among the starters twice (Wijk and Baden-Baden) and was victorious on both occasions. The same goes for Nakamura but in Gibraltar and in Zürich. The FIDE Grand Prix (Tiflis) saw an impressive victory by Tomashevsky.
€19.95
ChessBase Magazine 166
ChessBase Magazine 166
The high points of world class tournaments to marvel at and to enjoy: Gashimov Memorial Shamkir, Team World Championship and European Championship. Look forward to analyses by word class players, new trends in opening theory by Mihail Marin, and much more
€19.95
ChessBase Magazine 167
ChessBase Magazine 167
Enjoy the high points of Norway Chess 2015 and FIDE GP Khanty-Mansyisk with high-class annotations and “Round-up-shows” with Daniel King (video). 14 opening articles with lots of new ideas. Training sessions from the opening trap to pawn endings!
€19.95
ChessBase Magazine 168
ChessBase Magazine 168
Saint Louis and Biel - classical analyses + videos by King, Vachier-Lagrave, Kasimdzhanov, Williams. Tactics, Strategy and Endgame + 14 Opening articles with new ideas for your repertoire - look forward to a rich training programme!
€19.95